For Help Finding Suboxone Providers Near You Please Call (866)-296-3016? By calling this phone number you will be connected with a third party provider that works with Addiction Treatment Magazine to connect you with a Provider or Addiction Recovery Resource, as outlined in our Privacy Policy

Suboxone is a medication that is used to help treat those in New Hampshire who are struggling with addiction to heroin, fentanyl, or any other opiate substance. Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. This medically assisted treatment (MAT) option is only accessible through a doctor licensed to prescribe Subxone in New Hampshire who have completed addiction requirements to prescribe Suboxone to those seeking opioid addiction treatment. To prevent abuse, Suboxone doctors may set forth a rule that patients visit their office to take their doses for the first weeks or months.

Before the year 2000, Methadone was the most widely accepted drug used for opioid addiction management, with the caveat that it could only be prescribed via a methadone clinic. This limited access to MAT for opioid addicts. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 opened the door for individual doctors to be able to apply for a waiver, allowing them to prescribe Suboxone. It is important to[be aware that there are still strict regulations for these doctors that limit treatment, including limits to how many patients they are able to treat for opioid addiction.

For Help Finding Suboxone Providers Near You Please Call (866)-296-3016? By calling this phone number you will be connected with a third party provider that works with Addiction Treatment Magazine to connect you with a Provider or Addiction Recovery Resource, as outlined in our Privacy Policy

Finding a New Hampshire Suboxone Doctor

When searching for a Suboxone doctor in New Hampshire a good place to start is to research the options that are available and covered by health insurance. In addition to finding financially viable doctors, make sure they are qualified. Qualified physicians and mid-level practitioners in the U.S. must have an X-license to be able to prescribe Suboxone as a medication for opioid addiction treatment. It is also recommended to enroll in additional treatment programs that compliment recovery, such as outpatient programs, or other evidence-based treatment options to support a positive outcome while completing a Suboxone treatment regimens.

Success Rates of Suboxone Maintenance and Medically Assisted Detox

An addictive drug in itself, it is widely debated on whether Suboxone truly works to treat opioid addiction. Some people have reported great success with Suboxone treatment, whereas others did not. One study reported that 49% of participants abused prescription painkillers at a decreased rate while on Suboxone, but only 8.6% exhibited success once the Suboxone treatment ended. Other studies did not show long term recovery with a less than 10% success rate once treatment ceased, regardless of whether Suboxone treatment was combined with therapy or not.

Alternatives to Suboxone Treatment in New Hampshire

Suboxone is only one of numerous treatment options for those addicted to opioids. There are alternative substances that have previously been used in New Hampshire to treat addiction to opiates, including methadone and Naltrexone. These medications might be available to you but have different regulations. For example, methadone can only be administered at a licensed methadone clinic and not by an individual practitioner. For individuals who are determined to break free from addiction and who have access to a safe and supportive living situation, these medication assisted treatment options might work for you.

The following are indications that an individual is NOT a recommended candidate for Suboxone treatment:

  • Recent thoughts of suicide
  • Untreated mental health disorder
  • Pregnancy
  • alcohol use disorder
  • Previous allergic reaction to Suboxone
  • Drug interactions with other medications
  • Past abuse of medication assisted treatments

People who may not be able to receive Suboxone treatment, going cold turkey may be the best alternative option. People who plan to take this route, they can expect severe flu-like withdrawal symptoms and severe cravings. It is highly advised to get admitted to a New Hampshire opioid detox center that can assist in managing these symptoms.