For Help Finding Suboxone Providers Near You Please Call (866)-296-3016? By calling this phone number you will be connected with a third party provider that works with Addiction Treatment Magazine to connect you with a Provider or Addiction Recovery Resource, as outlined in our Privacy Policy

Below is a comprehensive directory of suboxone doctors in Greensboro, North Carolina. Read more about Greensboro suboxone treatment or click here to browse your local subxone doctors.

If you can't find a suboxone doctor close to you at the time you're looking for, we recommend checking out nearby towns including: Brightwood, Sedgefield, Summerfield, and Jamestown. Click here for Greensboro rehab centers.

For Help Finding Suboxone Providers Near You Please Call (866)-296-3016? By calling this phone number you will be connected with a third party provider that works with Addiction Treatment Magazine to connect you with a Provider or Addiction Recovery Resource, as outlined in our Privacy Policy

About Greensboro, NC Suboxone Doctors

Suboxone is a medication that is used to help treat people in Greensboro, NC who are struggling with addiction to opiates, whether pharmaceutical, illicitly-made, natural, or synthetic opiates. Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone: a partial opioid agonist that alleviates withdrawal symptoms and cravings without producing the same high, and a opioid agonist that causes withdrawal symptoms if Suboxone is injected directly into the bloodstream. This medication assisted treatment (MAT) option is solely accessible through Suboxone doctors in Greensboro, NC who have completed addiction requirements to prescribe Suboxone for opioid addiction treatment. To minimize the likelihood of abuse, Suboxone doctors may demand that patients visit their office to take their doses for the first weeks or months.

Before the year 2000, Methadone was the most widely accepted pharmaceutical treatment used for opioid addiction management, with the caveat that it could only be distributed by a clinic licensed for methadone treatment. This limited access to MAT for opioid addicts. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 opened the door for individual practitioners to be able to apply for a waiver, allowing them to prescribe Suboxone. to note that there are still strict regulations these doctors must follow that limit treatment. This includes how many patients they are able to treat for addiction to painkillers and other opiates.

Agnes Nwoko NP
700 Walter Reed Drive
Greensboro, NC
Alan Watt PA
5140 Dunstan Road
Greensboro, NC
Alisha Carter NP
2216 West Meadoview Road
Greensboro, NC
Angela Johnson NP
1207 4th Street
Greensboro, NC
Blair Crouse NP
407 South Mendenhall st
Greensboro, NC
Brian Belfi PA
Evans Blount Total Access Care2031 E. Martin Luther King Jr Drive
Greensboro, NC
Costin Gherghe
1200 N Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Archana Kumar MD
700 Walter Reed Drive
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Carol Sena MD
213 East Bessemer Avenue
Greensboro, NC
Dr. David Kaplan MD
3719 W Market StreetSuite B
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Erik Hoffman MD
1200 N Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Jason Mesner MD
1121 N Church Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Jeff Hatcher
Moses Cone Health System1200 N Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Jeremy Harrison
5140 Dunstan Road
Greensboro, NC
Dr. John Smith MD
301 S. Elm StreetSuite 305-6
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Kehinde Eniola MD
1125 N Church Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Keshavpal Reddy MD
603 Dolley Madison Road Suite 100
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Mark Scheutzow MD
Triad Behavioral Resources810 Warren St
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Mojeed Akintayo MD
3822 N Elm STSTE 101
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Roy Book MD
Gateway Health Inc.810 Warren Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Rupinder Kaur MD
706 Green Valley RoadSuite 506
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Sheila Stallings MD
709 East Market Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Thomas Brown MD
810 Warren Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Venkata Challa MD
3719-B West Market Street
Greensboro, NC
Erica Cox
213 E Bessemer Avenue
Greensboro, NC
Fred Amematsro NP
201 North Eugene Street
Greensboro, NC
Gregory Ellis MD
Crossroads Treatment Centers2706 North Church Street
Greensboro, NC
James Cox PA
Step by Step Care Inc709 Market Street
Greensboro, NC
Janelle Grossman NP
3402 Battleground Avenue
Greensboro, NC
Jason Berry NP
Cone Health Behavioral Health Hospital700 Walter Reed Drive
Greensboro, NC
Jo Hughes PA
603 Dolley Madison Road Suite #100
Greensboro, NC
Justina Okonkwo NP
700 Walter Reed Drive
Greensboro, NC
Kelly Virgil NP
2706 North Church Street
Greensboro, NC
Lashunda Thomas NP
700 Walter Reed Drive
Greensboro , NC
Laura Davis NP
700 Walter Reed Drive
Greensboro , NC
Marilyn Wade-Foster NP
203 Pomona Drive
Greensboro, NC
Masoud Hejazi
Presbyterian Counseling Center3713 Richfield Road
Greensboro, NC
Mitchell Bloom
7E Oak Branch Drive
Greensboro, NC
Robert Foster MD
3801 West Market Street
Greensboro, NC
Ryan Grunz MD
1200 N Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Sarah Bullard NP
1200 N Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Sendil Krishnan
1200 North Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Todd McDiarmid MD
1125 North Church Street
Greensboro, NC
Tracy Scott PA
213 East Bessemer Avenue
Greensboro, NC
Valerie Lavoie NP
3713 Richfield Road
Greensboro, NC
Wahiba Kartaoui
3801 West Market Street
Greensboro, NC
William Lancaster III
1121 North Church Street
Greensboro, NC
Tyler Terry
3402 Battleground Avenue
Greensboro, NC
Xilin Niu
1200 N. Elm Street
Greensboro, NC
Dr. Derek Richardson
1007 Summit Avenue
Greensboro, NC

Choosing a Greensboro, NC Suboxone Doctor

When selecting a Suboxone doctor in Greensboro, NC a good place to start is to research the options that are obtainable and covered by health insurance. In addition to finding a physician you can afford, make sure they are qualified. Qualified doctors and mid-level practitioners in America must have an X-license to be able to prescribe Suboxone to individuals battling opioid addiction. These individuals should also offer some sort of supplementary addiction support to ensure success whether that involves outpatient programs, or other evidence-based treatment options to ensure the most effective results while partaking in medication assisted treatment.

Success Rates of Suboxone Maintenance and Medically Assisted Detoxification

Success rates of Suboxone maintenance vary from one person to another. However, it is widely agreed upon that Suboxone is the most trusted medically assisted detox option to battle opioid addiction. In regard to Suboxone as MAT, research has proven that like other medications used for opioid treatment there is still a potential for abuse. Based on the potential for abuse, it is highly recommended by Suboxone doctors that dosage is monitored closely to ensure the highest success rates. To reiterate, the most significant success rates are seen when individuals on Suboxone for opiate addiction pair their prescription with other behavioral therapies andevidence-based options. In spite of the stigma that the recovery community may often face, many believe the research is clear and that MAT works!

Alternatives to Suboxone Treatment in Greensboro, NC

The medication Suboxone is made up of of two drugs. Those drugs are buprenorphine and naloxone, and the combination of the two has been approved by the FDA to treat opioid addiction. However, in recent years Suboxone has received significant criticism because of the potential risk of addiction to Subxone. There has also been an increase observed of people in medication assisted treatment programs Greensboro, NC having unintended overdoses. As a result, this has prompted others to seek alternative options. Alternative treatments people have invested in include methadone, going cold turkey, Subutex, or vivitrol. There are many options available and each person should research every option available with their physician before choosing which will be most effective to overcome opioid addiction.

Selecting a North Carolina Suboxone Doctor

When searching for a Suboxone doctor in North Carolina the first thing to do is to research the options that are obtainable and covered by your health care insurance. In addition to finding a physician you can afford, make sure they are qualified. Qualified doctors and mid-level practitioners in America must have an have a particular license, referred to as an x-license, to be able to prescribe Suboxone as a medication for opioid addiction treatment. Patients should also enroll in additional treatment programs that compliment recovery, such as outpatient programs, or other evidence-based treatment options to increase success while on Suboxone.

Success Rates of Suboxone Maintenance and Medically Assisted Detoxification

The success of Suboxone treatment varies from one person to another. However, it is widely supported that Suboxone is the most successful medically assisted detox option to battle opioid addiction. In regard to Suboxone as MAT, research has proven that similar to methadone there is still a potential for abuse. With these types of risks, it is greatly recommended by prescribing doctors that dosage is monitored closely to ensure the highest success rates. To reiterate, the most significant success rates are observed when individuals on Suboxone for opioid addiction pair medically assisted treatment with other behavioral therapies andevidence-based options. In spite of the stigma that some in the recovery community have, lots of people believe the research is obvious and that medication assisted treatment can create success stories!

Alternatives to Suboxone Treatment in North Carolina

Suboxone is only one of a number of treatment options for opioid addiction. There are alternative drugs that have previously been used in North Carolina for opioid addiction treatment, including methadone and Naltrexone. These medications might be available to you but have different regulations. For example, only methadone clinics can administer methadone. For addicts who are motivated to get clean and who have a supportive home environment or who live in a sober house, these medically assisted treatment options could be right for you.

There are contraindications for the use of Suboxone for opioid addiction treatment. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Recent suicidal thoughts
  • Untreated mental health disorder
  • Pregnancy
  • Alcohol dependence
  • Previous adverse reaction to Suboxone
  • Drug interactions with other medications
  • Previous abuse of MAT

People who may not be able to receive Suboxone treatment, abstinence may be the best alternative option. People who plan to abstain from heroin use, or any other opioid, can expect intense flu-like withdrawal symptoms and intense cravings. It is strongly advised to seek treatment from a North Carolina opioid detox center that can provide continuous care and monitoring.